When Should I Make a Referral?

You’re worried about a friend, classmate, colleague, or student on campus, but you aren’t sure if it warrants a CARE Referral. Below are some behaviors and indications that a fellow Deac might need some caring outreach and support from the CARE Team. 

These aren’t exhaustive lists, so you can also contact a CARE Team member or a liaison office member for a consultation. You can share your concerns about the Wake Forest community member, and they can provide guidance on whether or not a referral is warranted and next steps. You can find who to consult with listed here

When in doubt, make a referral! CARE Team members are trained in outreach, assessment, and response. They will reach out to the struggling community member after receiving the referral to offer support and assess their circumstances and needs. 

 

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For students:

  • Noticeable change in behavior or appearance: Is your friend suddenly acting differently than they have in the past? Are their moods difficult to predict? 
  • Isolating or withdrawing: Is your friend skipping meals, avoiding plans and social situations, or staying in their room all day? 
  • Sudden change in life circumstances: Are your friend’s parents divorcing? Did they recently suffer the loss of a family, friend, or loved one? Have they gone through a big breakup? Has their financial situation changed? Do they seem to be struggling to cope with these changes and loss?
  • Disclosed concerning information: Has your friend told you worrisome thoughts, behaviors, or experiences that you aren’t sure how to handle? Are you concerned about their wellbeing and aren’t sure how to help?

 

  • Unhealthy behavior: Is your friend drinking excessively, or abusing substances? Has their consumption increased? Do their behaviors feel reckless or out of control?
  • Threatening behavior: Has your friend or classmate made threatening or inflammatory remarks? Have you noticed them expressing an interest in concerning groups online or in person?
  • Academic decline: Has your friend begun to skip class more or stopped going altogether? Have you noticed their grades declining
  • Gut instinct: Do you have a feeling that something concerning is going on with your friend, roommate, or classmate, but you aren’t sure what? A CARE Team member can still provide caring outreach and offer support to students if you refer them in these cases.

For faculty & staff: 

  • Noticeable change in behavior or appearance: Is your colleague not wearing appropriate workplace attire? Are they suddenly very distracted, or hyper-focused? Has their productivity or workplace demeanor abruptly changed?
  • Isolating or withdrawing: Does your colleague no longer participate in socializing opportunities and/or avoid meetings? Do they avoid meetings, common spaces, and conversations, both personal and professional?
  • Disclosed concerning information: Has a colleague disclosed information to you that makes you worry about their wellbeing? Have they told you about abusive circumstances at home, or shared that they’re drinking or using substances more? Have they disclosed that they have harmed themselves?

 

  • Performance decline: Is your colleague’s work performance suffering? Are they unreliable in completing their tasks, or unresponsive to tasks or communications? Have you noticed they aren’t performing to their usual standards?
  • Threatening behavior: Has your colleague made threatening remarks or inflammatory remarks? Have you noticed them expressing interest in violent or hate groups, online or in person?
  • Gut instinct: Do you have a feeling something is going on with your colleague, but you aren’t sure what? A CARE Team member can still provide caring outreach and offer support to students if you refer them in these cases.